HPPN Spring Event

CALL FOR PAPERS

Tuesday, 16th March 2010

10.00-16.00

University of Manchester

The Health Policy & Politics Network (HPPN) is successor to the Politics of Health Group that has been run for the last 20 years or so in the form of a special interest group of the Political Studies Association. HPPN has now become independent in order more easily to encourage interdisciplinary working. HPPN aims to provide a forum for the reporting of research and analytical discussion about any aspect of the politics of health, health care policy or health services management and to facilitate the development of informal and collaborative relationships between academics and interested practitioners working in the above fields.

We invite submission of paper presentations to this free one-day event on any topic related to health politics, policy or management. Speakers will be allocated 20 minutes plus 10 minutes for discussion/questions.

To propose a paper, please submit an abstract to Imelda McDermott (imelda.mcdermott@manchester.ac.uk) by 16th February 2010. Notification of acceptance will be given by the end of February 2010.

To register, please fill in and return this Booking Form.

For further information:

Email: imelda.mcdermott@manchester.ac.uk
Website: https://hppnuk.wordpress.com/

To subscribe to updates via email please click on the following link:
http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=HealthPolicyPoliticsNetwork&loc=en_US

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

09.30-10.00 Registration

SESSION 1 (Chair: Steve Harrison)

10.00-10.25

Sue Llewellyn (Herbert Simon Institute for Public Policy & Management, University of Manchester)

Repositioning the patient – Repositioning the professionals.

10.25-10.50

Peter John (University of Manchester) & Keith Dowding (Australian National University)

How the response to voice can stem exit: Testing the impact of the responsiveness of education, health and local government services to individual complaints in the UK.

10.50-11.15

Alison Hann (Swansea University) & Stephen Peckham (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine)

Going for Gold: The relationship between beliefs, evidence and public health policy.

11.15-11.30 Tea/Coffee

SESSION 2 (Chair: Stephanie Snow)

11.30-11.55

Peter Baker (Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust)

From apartheid to neoliberalism: Health equity in post-apartheid South Africa.

11.55-12.20

Walter Flores (Centre for the Study of Equity and Governance in Health Systems)

Ethical principles and approaches to research governance in health care systems: Conceptual and methodological implications.

Governance in Municipal Development Councils of Guatemala: Analysis of actors and power relations.

12.20-12.45

Rebecca Mead (University of Chester)

Opening up the ‘Black Box’ of local delivery to improve health and reduce inequalities: A sociological study of one local public health system.

12.45-13.45 Lunch

SESSION 3 (Chair: Stephen Peckham)

13.45-14.10

Martin Powell, Ross Millar & Abeda Mulla (Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham)

‘Implementation is not always easy’? Revisiting Matland’s Ambiguity-Conflict Model of Policy Implementation to understand Lord Darzi’s Next Stage Review.

14.10-14.35

Rod Sheaff (University of Plymouth)

Organisational failure and flourishing following health system reform: Cases from primary care.

14.35-14.45 Tea/Coffee

SESSION 4 (Chair: Kath Checkland)

14.45-15.10

Mervyn Conroy (Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham)

The neglected milk of the neo-liberal cow: A crisis of ethical practice.

15.10-15.35

Evgeniya Plotnikova (University of Edinburgh)

International recruitment of health professionals in the NHS in the early 2000s: Between human rights and managerial discourse.

15.35-16.00

Sudeh Cheraghi-Sohi (National Primary Care Research & Development Centre, University of Manchester)

Understanding organisational and economic change in general practice: Shifting the focus from professionals to workers.

ABSTRACT

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