Teddy Chester Lecture 2011

September 8, 2011 at 12:55 pm | Posted in Conference | Leave a comment

Reorganising the English NHS 1974-2011: From design to doodle?

Prof Steve Harrison, Professor of Social Policy (former), University of Manchester

Monday 17 October 2011
5pm-7pm (including networking reception – lecture begins at 6pm)
Room G6, Manchester Business School, Booth Street West

The first great NHS reorganisation, in 1974, was the product of design: several years of policy discussion and academic analysis resulted in a blueprint that specified virtually every aspect of organisation and management. Numerous reorganisations later, by 2011, the doodle had become the norm; major restructuring sketched on the back of the metaphorical envelope. The lecture will explore competing explanations and prospects for this style of ‘policy making’ in the English NHS.

Steve Harrison retired as Professor of Social Policy at the University of Manchester in 2011. After spells as head of Applied Social Science and head of public policy research, he was Director of the Health Policy, Politics and Organisation research group from 2005 until 2011. He was previously Professor of Health Policy and Politics at the University of Leeds. His research interests have encompassed  both political/ policy analysis and substantial empirical investigation of NHS organisations, including such matters as organisational incentives and ‘performance’ management, professional autonomy, health care rationing,  local managerial strategies in relation to the professions and the public, labour relations, and the scientific knowledge base of medicine. He has been an investigator on over 60 externally funded research projects, and author or co-author of a dozen books and over one hundred peer-reviewed papers.

For further details or to book a place at this free event, please contact Joanne Cherry 0161 275 6403, or via email: joanne.cherry@mbs.ac.uk

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